From adventuresinunemployment:
As reported by Dealbreaker, here’s a story of a rough second interview.

According to the South China Morning Post,



“mainland job-seekers are increasingly required to exhibit ‘grey  skills’ – binge drinking, playing mahjong and even ballroom dancing – to  provide them with an edge in the market.”



The events that led up to the scene above?



At noon, the company leader invited them for lunch. Eager to impress the  boss, they competed in drinking more alcohol. In the end they were  wasted. At first, they just sat on the ground chatting, but soon three  of them lied down and passed out.

From adventuresinunemployment:

As reported by Dealbreaker, here’s a story of a rough second interview.

According to the South China Morning Post,

“mainland job-seekers are increasingly required to exhibit ‘grey skills’ – binge drinking, playing mahjong and even ballroom dancing – to provide them with an edge in the market.”

The events that led up to the scene above?

At noon, the company leader invited them for lunch. Eager to impress the boss, they competed in drinking more alcohol. In the end they were wasted. At first, they just sat on the ground chatting, but soon three of them lied down and passed out.

Reblogged from adventuresinunemployment
Monday will mark an event so momentous it took a presidential order to make it happen. On Nov. 1 the Office of Personnel Management — the U.S. government’s HR arm — will no longer require written essays to apply for a job.

ERE.net goes on to say that government agencies may move from essays to assessments.  You could hire someone to write your essay in the past - now you have to take an assessment as part of the interview.

Farewell Federal Essays. Hello Assessments via ERE.net

The right column is the earlier series for the info, so according to Glassdoor’s data more people are applying online and less are going thru recruiters.  Makes sense given the employment situation and new grads in May of this year.  What I find interesting is that employee referrals have stayed roughly the same.  Either companies aren’t hiring or people aren’t connected well enough to be able to refer someone they trust in their network.
Nailing The Job Interview; A Past, Present And Future Perspective

The right column is the earlier series for the info, so according to Glassdoor’s data more people are applying online and less are going thru recruiters.  Makes sense given the employment situation and new grads in May of this year.  What I find interesting is that employee referrals have stayed roughly the same.  Either companies aren’t hiring or people aren’t connected well enough to be able to refer someone they trust in their network.

Nailing The Job Interview; A Past, Present And Future Perspective

 
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I can work 25 hours a day if necessary, live on any reasonable salary, and don’t give a black damn for job security, office politics, or adverse public relations.

I would rather be on the dole than work for a paper I was ashamed of.

A small excerpt from Hunter S. Thompson’s Cover Letter to the Vancouver Sun.

How many times have you said that you’d rather be unemployed than work at a company you’re ashamed of?  I don’t mean said as an aside to friends and family, I mean said directly in a cover letter or interview.

Don’t Be Late. Seriously.

Yes and yes.

suzie-staffer:

I can’t stress enough how important it is to be on time for your interviews. Bad weather is no excuse to be late. Your interview is the potential employers precurser to your behavior as an employee. For, if you’re late for your interview, you’re sending the message that you’ll be late for work. Always plan ahead. Give at least 24 hours notice if you need to reschedule. And, only do so in an extreme emergency. That is all.

It’s so simple to be on time but so often interviewees get to their destination 5-10 min late.  Don’t be that person.  You’re not just sending a message that you’ll be late for work but that you don’t respect other people’s time.  Now if you get there on time and they keep you waiting 15 min, then they’re saying the same thing.

Reblogged from suzie-staffer
via adventuresinunemployment (and originally from unicornology)
Personal branding is fun, sure.  But it’s important to stand for something.  Look at the companies around today, both big and small.  The successful ones follow a very clear and well defined mission.  They stand for great products, experiences, services.  They sweat the details and have an opinion.
Being bland, generic, and keeping your image clean will only get you so far.  When you get an interview, it pays to have some balls.

via adventuresinunemployment (and originally from unicornology)

Personal branding is fun, sure.  But it’s important to stand for something.  Look at the companies around today, both big and small.  The successful ones follow a very clear and well defined mission.  They stand for great products, experiences, services.  They sweat the details and have an opinion.

Being bland, generic, and keeping your image clean will only get you so far.  When you get an interview, it pays to have some balls.

adventuresinunemployment:

Just when life as an unemployed person was starting to get really rough, I got an email from the Ministry of Finance in Nigeria saying that they’re finally paying me that $3.5 million they’ve been promising. REJOICE!

adventuresinunemployment:

Just when life as an unemployed person was starting to get really rough, I got an email from the Ministry of Finance in Nigeria saying that they’re finally paying me that $3.5 million they’ve been promising. REJOICE!

Reblogged from adventuresinunemployment
I don’t just think outside the box, I stand on top of it. I aim to appease my employer. If he/she isn’t satisfied with my work, I will sweat blood and tears until I get them the result that they are enamored with. If my employer wants me to be knowledgeable of a certain person, place or thing; I will research that particular subject until I know everything that Google, Lycos, Yahoo, Ask Jeeves and Encyclopedia Britannica has to say about them/it…
Lifehacker has a hilarious post called “How To Avoid Writing An Awful Cover Letter.” It has some fabulously bad examples from real, and really terrible, cover letters. (via adventuresinunemployment)
Reblogged from adventuresinunemployment
via Zeldman, who says it best - what a way to go.  Photos sent out to the entire company detailing her reason for leaving.

via Zeldman, who says it best - what a way to go.  Photos sent out to the entire company detailing her reason for leaving.

Understand Company Financials

I recently read Alexandra Levit’s post Interviewing? Choose a Strong Company about looking into company financials when looking for companies to work at.  I don’t think enough interviewees think about this:

If a company of interest is public, monitor its stock price, forecasts, executive turnover, and paperwork submitted to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). You can also do a Google search for recent financial news, and read the releases on the company’s investor relations website.

Don’t know what to look for?  Visit Fred Wilson’s A VC blog and checkout his “MBA Mondays" posts.  While some of the topics may be above your head you need to make sure you have a firm understanding of how the company makes money, where they are growing, and how they create value in the marketplace.

If you’re looking to work in a specific industry it is absolutely crucial to know which companies are innovating and thriving and which ones are seeing their margins shrink are competition increases.

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The blog for funnelthru.com - a job board dedicated to honest entry level jobs. We discuss interview tips, hiring trends, videos we love, and anything else we think you might find useful or fun.